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Charlton County Region  1760 - 1784

from DeBRAHM’S REPORT OF THE GENERAL SURVEY IN THE SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NORTH AMERICA        

University of South Carolina Press, 1971

Page 39

Georgia, while frequently preoccupied with the threat of attack during the period of the French and Indian War, was fortunate in averting any large-scale hostility. The colony’s leaders had succeeded in maintaining a peaceful relationship with the neighboring Indian tribes while South Carolina had suffered the ravages of the Cherokee War at the opening of the 1760s.

…..In 1763, with the signing of the “Definitive Treaty of Peace” in Paris, the Spanish surrendered their colony of Florida to the British. Georgia was thus freed of the Damoclean threat from the south which had influenced its development since its inception under Oglethorpe’s guidance thirty years before. A decision reached by the British Crown in the same year MADE SAINT MARY’S RIVER THE COLONY’S SOUTHERN BOUNDARY and formally permitted Georgians to extend their settlements to the region south of the Altamaha River. In 1784, a commission to the governor of Georgia further defined the colony’s bounds and made the Mississippi River the westernmost boundary.

AFTER THE CIVIL WAR

"Almost Forgotten Historical Notes"

 By John Harris

Charlton County Herald

September 14, 1977

Francis Marion Mizell, son of Perry Stallings Mizell and Charlotte Albritton Mizell, was one of Jefferson Davis’ personal aides and was captured with him in Irwin County near Ocilla and was carried to Fort Moultrie, S.C., where he languished and died in a filthy dungeon there.

The election at Traders Hill, soon after the close of the War for Southern Independence, was manned by three black poll holders. Voters who had become of age since the close of the War, all others being disenfranchised, had to march to the polls between lines of Yankee soldiers forming an arch of guns with fixed bayonets. The list of those voting was not large.

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